Thursday , Aug , 10 , 2006 C.Y. Ellis

Nate Thurmond


Nate Thurmond

Nate Thurmond

Date of Birth:25 July 1941
Born At: Akron, OH USA
Height: 6’11"
NBA Experience :14 seasons

Career accomplishments

  • NBA All-Rookie Team (1964)
  • NBA All-Defensive First Team (1969, 1971)
  • NBA All-Defensive Second Team (1972-74)
  • Seven-time NBA All-Star (1965-69, 1970, 1973, 1974)
  • Scored 14,437 points (15.0 ppg) in 964 games
  • Grabbed 14,464 rebounds (15.0) in 964 games, seventh best in history
  • Upon enshrinement, his 14,464 boards were fourth best in history
  • Had eight seasons with 1,000 or more rebounds (1965-69, 1971-73), including a career-best 22.0 rpg in 1968
  • Holds the NBA record for most rebounds in one quarter (18 vs. Baltimore on Feb. 28, 1965)
  • Warriors leading rebounder (12,771)
  • Grabbed a career-high 42 rebounds against Detroit (Nov. 9, 1965), making him one of only four players in history (Wilt Chamberlain, Bill Russell, Jerry Lucas) to achieve that feat
  • First player to record a quadruple-double (1974) with 22 points, 14 rebounds, 13 assists and 12 blocked shots in an overtime victory against the Atlanta Hawks
  • Holds record for most rebounds in a quarter (18 on Feb. 28, 1965)
  • NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team (1996
  • Nate Thurmond biography

    A genial giant of a man, Nate Thurmond was one of the all-time great NBA centers, with a rugged, in-your-face style of play that frequently intimidated even Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Wilt Chamberlain. The Hall of Famer played 14 professional seasons in the 1960s and 1970s, posting career averages of 15.0 points and 15.0 rebounds per game. Among the all-time NBA leaders in career rebounds and rebounding average, Thurmond was selected to play in seven NBA All-Star Games and was selected to the NBA All-Defensive First or Second Team five times. He still holds the NBA record for most rebounds in a quarter with 18, and he owns the distinction of being the first player ever to record a quadruple-double. Thurmond made history as the first player ever to record a quadruple double. NBA Photos Some basketball observers have suggested that the 6-11 Thurmond provided the best mix of offense and defense in basketball history. Many say that his defense was better than Chamberlain’s, and that his offense was better than Bill Russell’s. With quickness and long hands, a smooth outside shooting touch, tenacious rebounding, classic shotblocking ability, and a total team attitude, Thurmond offered a perfectly balanced package. Born in Akron, Ohio, in 1941, Thurmond starred at Akron’s Central Hower High School, where he teamed with future NBA star Gus Johnson. He then enrolled at Bowling Green State University, where he averaged 17.8 points and 17.0 rebounds over three varsity seasons, earning All-America honors as a senior in 1963. The San Francisco Warriors selected Thurmond with the third overall pick in the 1963 NBA Draft, behind Art Heyman of Duke and Rod Thorn of West Virginia. Thurmond played 11 seasons for the Warriors, becoming nearly as familiar in the Bay Area as the Golden Gate Bridge. Thurmond spent his rookie season as an apprentice to Chamberlain, who had come into the league with the Philadelphia Warriors in 1959 and then moved with the franchise to San Francisco in 1962. While Chamberlain was averaging 36.9 points and 22.3 rebounds in 1963-64, Thurmond put up modest numbers in limited playing time. Still, his 7.0 points and 10.4 rebounds per contest earned him a berth on the NBA All-Rookie Team. The Warriors advanced all the way to the 1964 NBA Finals, where they lost to the Boston Celtics in five games. As the season and postseason wore on, Thurmond spent more and more time alongside Chamberlain in the team’s frontcourt. His playing time increased from 25.9 minutes per game in the regular season to 34.2 in the playoffs, and Thurmond responded with 10.0 points and 12.3 rebounds per game. Perhaps encouraged by Thurmond’s development, the Warriors traded Chamberlain to the Philadelphia 76ers midway through the 1964-65 season, giving Thurmond the center position all to himself. With the increased playing time, Thurmond’s numbers grew to All-Star proportions. He finished with averages of 16.5 ppg and 18.1 rpg in a workmanlike 41.2 minutes per game. In a contest at Baltimore on February 28, 1965, Thurmond set an NBA record that still stands decades later. He grabbed 18 rebounds in one quarter against the Bullets, breaking the previous record of 17 shared by Russell and Chamberlain. His season rebounding total of 1,395 placed him third in the league behind Russell and Chamberlain. Despite Thurmond’s impressive campaign, Chamberlain’s departure had a devastating effect on the Warriors. One year removed from playing for the championship, San Francisco finished the 1964-65 campaign with a 17-63 record, the worst in the NBA by 14 games. Rick Barry arrived for the 1965-66 season and helped lead San Francisco back to respectability at 35-45, though the Warriors missed the playoffs for the second straight year. By 1966-67, however, San Francisco was back on track. Barry’s league-leading 35.6 ppg propelled the Warriors back into the NBA Finals, where they lost to a powerful Philadelphia 76ers squad le