Saturday , Aug , 18 , 2007 Oly Sandor

Why NBA Players Can’t Have Hobbies Featuring L.A. Lakers’ Vlad Radmanovic & Minnesota Timberwolves’ Mark Madsen

Times have thankfully changed. After Mark Madsen’s jet-skiing accident and Vlad Radmanovic’s snowboarding injury, franchises must be praying players return to making hip hop music. Both Madsen and Radmanovic were lucky not to have their contracts voided …

The Associated Press reports on Mark Madsen injuring himself in a watercraft accident:

Minnesota Timberwolves forward Mark Madsen had surgery on his shoulder Friday, four days after he was hurt on a personal watercraft.

Madsen was using the watercraft Monday and was hurt after he had to bail off the machine and dive into the water, a team spokesman said. Team orthopedic surgeon Dr. David Fischer and Dr. Brad Nelson performed the surgery to repair his right shoulder.

If all goes well with his rehabilitation, Madsen should return some time in November.

"This was an unfortunate accident that I have put behind me. My focus now is to concentrate on my rehabilitation with the goal of returning to the basketball court as quickly as possible," Madsen said in a statement issued by the team.

The veteran forward averaged just 1.1 points and 1.6 rebounds in 56 games last season, but the team was going to lean heavily on Madsen this season while developing a core of young players after trading All-Star forward Kevin Garnett to Boston.

My Quick Take: A few years back, teams were fearful when players recorded rap albums. Spitting risqué lyrics over a buddy’s beat was seen as a ‘dangerous’ hobby; a pursuit which consumed too much of a player’s time and usually drew the ire of the NBA’s conservative Commissioner.

Times have thankfully changed. After Mark Madsen’s jet-skiing accident and ’s snowboarding injury, franchises must be praying players return to making hip hop music. Both and Radmanovic were lucky not to have their contracts voided.

Players have lives and off-court interests. Fair enough. But why risk your career taking part in a potentially dangerous hobby? Why put your team at risk, too? For example, I love Steve Nash’s passion for soccer. ‘Footie’ has molded and shaped his point guard skills. But what happens if he breaks a bone during his summer kickarounds in New York? are finished. And Phoenix’s fans and management would not be pleased.

I broke my leg in several places playing competitive soccer. It took me sixteen months to make a full recovery. I would hate to see something similar happen to the NBA’s best table-setter.

And I’m rooting for a Jay Williams comeback. I loved his swagger at Duke. But the former admits that owning a motorcycle was a mistake.

Hopefully, Madsen makes a full recovery. And other NBA players take a moment to consider the risks they take with their off-court pursuits.

What do you think of NBA players taking off-court risks? Get at us in the comment box below with your thoughts.

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