Monday , Oct , 15 , 2007 Oly Sandor

Phoenix Suns Should Not Trade Shawn Marion Straight-Up For Utah Jazz’s Andrei Kirilenko

Smith then claims that Marcus Banks’ salary is holding up the trade. Basically, Phoenix demanded that Utah take Banks’ salary as part of any trade for Marion. And Larry Miller, the Jazz’s owner and de facto GM, said no. I see it differently. The Suns should come to their senses and keep Marion …

Sam Smith, a writer for The Chicago Tribune, argues that Utah and Phoenix would both benefit from trading Andrei Kirilenko for Shawn Marion.

Finally, an exhibition game to get excited about. Is it possible Shawn Marion and Andrei Kirilenko will be traded for one another at halftime Monday when the Jazz plays the Suns? Could Kirilenko and Marion play against their former teams in the second half? They’d have to pass physicals quickly

Hard to figure why this deal hasn’t happened yet. Here are the NBA’s two unhappiest stars this side of Kobe Bryant, and there’s good reason for each team to make the deal. Both teams say there’s nothing going on. You have to wonder why.

My Quick Take: Smith is one of the NBA’s best reporters. For several seasons, he has provided in-depth coverage as an NBA writer for The Chicago Tribune.

I disagree with this morning’s article. Smith’s view is that and would both prosper from swapping unhappy forwards-again, Kirilenko for Marion. He claims the trade would be mutually beneficial for both sides and supports his stance with reasonable examples. Fair enough.

Smith then claims that Marcus Banks’ salary is holding up the trade. Basically, Phoenix demanded that Utah take Banks’ salary as part of any trade for Marion. And Larry Miller, the Jazz’s owner and de facto GM, said no.

I see it differently. The Suns should come to their senses and keep Marion. Here’s why:

  • The Matrix has world-class speed. His quickness sets up Phoenix‘s entire seven seconds to shoot offense. This hi-paced system is what they do best.
  • Robert Sarver, Phoenix‘s owner, wants his team to maintain financial flexibility. Marion has two years left on his max contract, while Kirilenko has four years and $63 million dollars remaining on his deal. The Suns, with AK-47, would be adding salary, while getting worse. Sarver apparently signed off on some sort of Kirilenko-for-Marion deal, which I don’t get.
  • Marion‘s flexibility is an asset. Phoenix can go small and use him at the four-spot. Kirilenko can’t play power forward, so the Suns would lose that edge with the Russian in their line-up.

Phoenix coach Mike D’Antonio had a long European career, so he has a soft spot for international stars like Kirilenko. D’Antonio must realize that Marion straight-up for Kirilenko is not a fair deal. The Suns must get more in return.

Should the Suns trade Marion for Kirilenko? Get at us in the comment box below with your thoughts.

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