Wednesday , Oct , 17 , 2007 Oly Sandor

Jerry Buss & L.A. Lakers Can’t Win By Trading Kobe Bryant

An auction would never happen. But why are we micro-analyzing trivial details-like the inner-meaning of Bryant cleaning his locker-when we know the outcome? And the outcome is this: Kobe Bryant will be traded from the L.A. Lakers.

The last few days, specifically Buss’ tell-all interview, have proven this point. The 70-year old playboy didn’t run his mouth to the L.A. Times. This was no accident. And he wasn’t misquoted.

In a couple of weeks, Jerry Buss and the NBA’s 29 other owners should gather at some swank hotel. They should drink rare wine, eat fine meat, and make small talk for an hour or so. 

Once the formalities are finished, David Stern’s billionaire boys club should move to the hotel’s conference room and bid on Kobe Bryant’s services. That’s right. Buss should hire Robin Leach as MC and auction off the world’s best baller.

The facts support this idea. Kobe Bryant wants a trade. The Lakers want to trade him. And other teams want to acquire him. Simple stuff.

I know. An auction would never happen. But why are we micro-analyzing trivial details-like the inner-meaning of Bryant cleaning his locker-when we know the inevitable outcome? And the outcome is this: Kobe Bryant will be traded from the L.A. Lakers.

The last few days, specifically Buss’ tell-all interview, have proven this point. The 70-year old playboy didn’t run his mouth to the L.A. Times. This was no accident. And he wasn’t misquoted.

The purple-and-gold’s Godfather publicly turned on his number one capo because the organization has decided to trade Bryant. What other reason is there for opening up in a tell-all interview?

Here’s where things get interesting. Buss and the Lakers can’t get equal value for Bryant in a trade because such a thing doesn’t exist. No team has a package of players that can measure up to Bryant’s on-court brilliance. And no one star can dazzle the Hollywood elite like #24, either.

Buss has put himself in a tricky predicament. Further complicating the situation is Bryant’s opt-out clause for after the 2008-09 season. A trade won’t be easy to swing. On second thought, an auction doesn’t sound like such a bad idea, after all.

Do the Lakers have to trade Bryant? Can they get equal value in return? Click here to read and subscribe to Oly Sandor’s NBA Blog.

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