Wednesday , Nov , 12 , 2008 Oly Sandor

Explaining the great NBA Point Guard crash of 2008-09

I was taught that point guards matter. The good ‘ones’ (pun intended) distribute, set the tone, act as on-court coaches, and are usually sipping champagne and hoisting the championship trophy come June. Yet table-setters have been taking more hits than Freddie Mae, Fannie Mac, and Lehman Brothers combined. Real estate and stocks look good when compared to the recent crash of NBA point guards …


Explaining the great NBA Point Guard crash of 2008-09I was taught that point guards matter. The good ‘ones’ (pun intended) distribute, set the tone, act as on-court coaches, and are usually sipping champagne and hoisting the championship trophy come June.

Yet table-setters have been taking more hits than Freddie Mae, Fannie Mac, and Lehman Brothers combined. Real estate and stocks look good when compared to the recent crash of NBA point guards.

I thought teams built around this position. Each day word surfaces of another unhappy lead-guard and the possibility of him transitioning elsewhere.

Currently, I count five point guards caught in messy feuds. New York and Indiana are trying to find takers for Stephon Marbury and Jamaal Tinsley. Larry Brown, when not searching for his next job, is tiring on Ray Felton, while Sergio Rodriguez is tiring of Portland. And Earl Watson wants out of Oklahoma City.

Each scenario is different, so I can’t point to one specific reason. With Tinsley, off-court troubles are to blame. However, a few factors have made point guards more expendable than ever.

Scorers are out. For too long the line has been blurred and shooting guards like Marbury were allowed to play the point because of their size. No more. Lately, the trend has shifted back to team ball, which means ‘tweeners’, and their I-gotta-get-mine style, are done.

Teams have options. They can turn to Europe and make Jose Calderon, Tony Parker, and Beno Udrih their starting point guard. Or they can allow a superstar like Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, or Dwyane Wade to serve as primary ball handler.

Coaches want specific things from point guards. Many see the point guard as an extension of the bench. Yet, the NBA is a result driven business and inevitably coaches get fired. Any new sideline boss will consider changing the point guard spot and bringing in his own guy.

Why do you think point guards are vulnerable? Who moves on first? Marbury? Tinsley? Felton? Rodriguez? Or Watson? Get at us in the comment box below and come back to HoopsVibe the Blog for more NBA tidbits.