reggie-miller
Easter Sunday- 5 Greatest “Comebacks” In NBA History
Saturday , Mar , 30 , 2013 Paul Eide

Easter Sunday- 5 Greatest “Comebacks” In NBA History

While you're chasing the Easter Bunny tomorrow, don't forget to stop, think and reflect on the NBA.

HoopsVibe Very Quick Call: In honor of what some call the greatest "comeback" in history, i.e. the resurrection tomorrow, check out this list.

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Forget “Dream Team”- Is 2012 US Squad Better Than Version II or Even III?
Thursday , Aug , 02 , 2012 Paul Eide

Forget “Dream Team”- Is 2012 US Squad Better Than Version II or Even III?

Thanks to comments by Kobe Bryant and LeBron James, we've heard a lot of comparisions between the 2012 USA Olympic basketball team and the 1992 "Dream Team" that featured 11 hall of fame players. But how does the 2012 version stack up against versions II and III? 

HoopsVibe Very Quick Call: The two following incarnations of the "Dream Team" were also stacked, but everyone seems to forget about them.

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Sunday , Feb , 12 , 2012 Hoopsvibe

Spike Lee ‘thanks’ Mark Jackson and Warriors for cutting Jeremy Lin

According to Jackson, Lee “thanked” Jackson for making Lin available so that the Knicks could pick him up. “I got a text message from Spike Lee this morning,” Jackson said after Warriors’ practice on Saturday. “I had nothing to do with Jeremy Lin. I never saw him do a layup. So for the people … stop asking me. He never practiced for us so leave me out of it.”

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HoopsVibe’s Very Quick Call: Of course, the New York Knicks’ superfan, director Spike Lee, has a funny take on Jeremy Lin.

After all, Lee, also known as Mars Blackman, once took on the entire Indiana Pacers -in particular Hall of Fame two-guard Reggie Miller. Who can forget Reggie flashing the infamous choke sign at Lee in the mid nineties?

For better or worse, this is who Lee is. It’s no surprise he texted Mark Jackson, ‘thanking’ the Golden State Warriors’ coach for waiving Lin, the Knicks’ newfound saviour at point guard.

In Jackson’s defense, he already has two talented, smaller guards: Stephen Curry and Monta Ellis. No minutes were available for Lin, who would have languished on the Warriors’ bench.

Bottom line: every NBA-er has talent. Lin’s success, like many players, is about finding the right opportunity. And he has his opportunity in New York.

Just don’t tell Lee. Why spoil the fun?

Got thoughts? Well, get at HoopsVibe News in the comment box below.

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Monday , Sep , 06 , 2010 Hoopsvibe

Reggie Miller: Dwyane Wade is Derek Jeter, LeBron James is Alex Rodriguez

Wattage aside, perhaps the Miami Heat’s cast of superheros -- or villains, depending on your point of view -- will not be led by King James. TNT's Reggie Miller said the Heat’s star system is simple: " Dwyane Wade is the Derek Jeter here. LeBron James is the Alex Rodriguez. One of those guys will have to sacrifice, and it will have to be LeBron. This is still Dwyane's team."

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HoopsVibe’s Very Quick Call:
Sorry Reggie, but Dwyane Wade and LeBron James are different than Derek Jeter and Alex Rodriguez.

First, Wade and James are boys. They wanted to play together. They’ve been scheming on this longer than you’ve been dead weight on TNT’s broadcast staff.

Jeter and Rodriguez aren’t close. They were forced to play together. They tolerate each other. It’s a professional relationship. Nothing more.

Second, basketball is more of a team sport than baseball. In the NBA, truly great players transcend statistics and bring out the greatness in each other.

LeBron will be a Magic Johnson style distributor for the Miami Heat. His points will decrease, but his assists will skyrocket, propelling the Three Kings deep into the playoffs.

This won’t diminish LeBron’s status. It will do the opposite. In the NBA, great players make those around them better and procure championships. They don’t worry about ‘sacrificing’ regular season scoring numbers.

That’s the difference between basketball and baseball.

To be a crème de la crème talent in the NBA, a player must stack Larry O’Brien trophies. It’s the only currency of greatness. It’s the sole measuring stick. So players are willing to work together.

MLB is a numbers game. It’s more an individual sport. A player can be an all-time great if he has ‘his’ statistics. Team success takes a backseat and is less important. 

Wade and LeBron aren’t Jeter and Rodriguez. They’ll make their partnership work. They’ll win. And that’s all that should matter.

--Oly Sandor.

Got thoughts? Well, get at HoopsVibe News in the comment box below.

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Monday , Jun , 14 , 2010 Hoopsvibe

Best playoff block ever: Tony Allen on Pau Gasol or Tayshaun Prince on Reggie Miller?

HoopsVibe's Very Quick Call: It was a momentum swinger.

In game-five of the 2010 NBA Finals, Tony Allen delivered a one-two combo block that sparked the Boston Celtics. Allen, an athletic swing, appeared from the helpside to emphatically deny Los Angeles Lakers post Pau Gasol a left-handed chippie.

The play reminded me of one thing: Tayshaun Prince on Reggie Miller.

Back in the 2004 Eastern Conference Finals, Prince preserved a key Detroit Pistons win against the Indiana Pacers by heroically blocking what seemed like a gimme lay-up for clutch closer and superstar Reggie Miller. 

The Piston won the game. And later they won the 2004 NBA Title.

So watch both clips and get at us with your call on the best playoff block ever: Allen on Gasol or Prince on Miller.  

(Allen with the one-two combo block.) 

(Prince with the amazing block on Miller.) 

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Monday , May , 31 , 2010 Hoopsvibe

Ron Artest’s greatest regret: ‘bailing out on that Pacer team’

"The biggest regret of my life, really, is bailing out on that Pacer team," Artest said. "I mean, outside not going to church every single Sunday, bailing out on that Pacer team is my biggest regret. Every time I see Jermaine, every time I see Steve [Jackson] and Jamaal [Tinsley] ... I get a little bit of a feeling when I see Bird, because he was such a great player and I respect him so much. So I get that feeling when I see Bird. I feel like a coward. I feel like I don't even belong in their presence, really."

"When I saw Jermaine [this season], I felt like I didn't even belong in the same room as him," Artest said. "I felt like a coward. I don't like feeling like a coward, and I feel like a coward. That's the biggest regret of my life. Steve Jackson, Jermaine, Jamaal, even Jeff [Foster] -- a blue-collar guy like him, put his life on the line for us on the court, and I totally disrespected him. And of course Reggie. I was in a position to win a championship, Reggie was in position, and I bailed out on Reggie. I feel like a coward. A big-time coward. It's hard for me to even speak to them, hard for me to see them."

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HoopsVibe's Quick Call: Love him or hate him, Ron Artest is honest and his heart seems to be in the right place.

After all, few athletes in the cut throat, macho world of pro sports would publicly admit to such feelings, especially about an incident that took place years ago with the Indiana Pacers.

Still, it's great Artest understands the impact his actions have on others. And, in some strange way, it's hard not to cheer for him -regardless of what you think about the Los Angeles Lakers.

Got thoughts on Ron-Ron's comments? Get at us in the opinion box below.        

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Wednesday , Apr , 21 , 2010 Hoopsvibe

Ray Allen: The NBA Is Softer Now

"The league is a lot softer," Allen said less than 72 hours after teammate Kevin Garnett elbowed Miami's Quentin Richardson in the final moments of Game 1.

Garnett was suspended one game for his actions in Boston's victory.

"The slightest little touch and you're at the foul line," Allen said of today's game. "It's like you have to be tricky."

Allen then gave a perfect example of how the NBA has changed over the course of his career.

"Reggie [Miller] would grab my hands and throw them one way while going the other way," he said, adding that he was expected by referees and coaches to defend such a move.
 
The NBA’s 50 Worst Tattoos
Sunday , Apr , 11 , 2010 C.Y. Ellis

The NBA’s 50 Worst Tattoos

You wouldn't believe the number of inky abominations etched into the pelts of pro ballers.  I'd originally planned a simple list of the league's ten worst tats, but when my dishonourable mention section hit double digits I realised I'd need to expand the scope of the project a little.  Even when I elongated the list to twenty-five terrible tattoos, I still found that I had to exclude some real atrocities.  In the end it took a full fifty spots to showcase the shittiest skin art in the L.

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